• Sci Fi & Fantasy
  • Mystery & Thrillers
  • Teens & YA
  • Horror
  • Humor
  • Romance
  • Erotica
  • Comics & Graphic Novels

11 Things I hate about Philipine Dramas and Movies

0

Unlikely if not Terrible Makeup

Scenario 1: The kontrabida or antagonist is held in prison for days. Even with a bad setting, she'd never ever forget to put her red lipstick on.

Scenario 2: A character is dying. And he still looks healthy. Why don't these TV Companies take from Koreans who'd put on makeup convincingly? Give the actor some palor or provide with sweating effect as the character tries to cling on to life.

The Female Protagonist often appeal to Sympathy.

The leading lady usually has a lousy backbone. She gets hit and slapped by the love interest's mother and she couldn't fight back! Okay, this paves way for a character development later on. But why must her woe involve meeting with an accident that in a way is the guy's fault? Generally, what I feel for the leading lady is pity and later on, I'd realize that I was never amazed by her character. The only reason I stay put is because she has a pleasing face and often accompanied by a sexy body behind her modest attire.

Often she'd have amnesia after getting hit by a car that just spurt out of nowhere or after falling and rolling on the side of a mountain after a failed attempt of murder by the very evil antagonist.

The antagonist is just too evil.

Damn this classic villain thing. Baby, he's just born that way. Little is known why the hero's nemesis became the asshole that he is, although I noticed now a slow change wherein the kontrabida later on is redeemed and that there will be a back story on his part.

The protagonist is just way too good that she's nothing but a flat celluloid character.

The antagonist could try to kill her so many times and she'd always forgive her. Even Frodo Baggins got corrupted by the ring...

There's now an attempt at copying (Koreanovela) Korean series' style of having the story centered about some family company or business that isn't about Hacienda.

Like I said, just an attempt. The whole element is still sloppy and shallow, I'm not convinced that there's a business nor there is a company. I'm merely seeing the characters parroting about every episode, dealing with something fictional. To make a story work, one must convince the audience.

The police force appears only by the end of the film.

For a telenovela, there's no consistency with the story as the main story is drafted with an open end.

For Korean and Japanese tv series, usually the series is set to end at the 26th episode. The script's already written for all episodes even before the shooting begins. Whereas for the Philipine TV, there's no way of telling when the show is going to end. If the show keeps a high rating, episodes will just keep on piling almost to no end. I rather appreciate America's style of dropping a tv series when the pilot episode flops at rating.

Excessive plot twists

There's just no way that a telenovela is tangible in real life. Because of the need to write more episodes just to keep the show going, often the show is glazed with regurgitating scenarios. The whole plot becomes too unbelievable paving way to...

Too improbable sibling circumstances

Usually the plot goes like this: One guy is a fraternal twin (since two actors don't look alike) of the other guy (usually the antagonist) who got separated at birth from his real family after an act done by another bad person (usually the “mother” of the antagonist). But then this scenario is way better than the usual plot of the protagonist being exchanged with the antagonist's poor family at birth. But come on, just stop this twin-siblings-angle!

Deus ex Machina

There will be a new character introduced (as a way of promoting a new actor by the company) if not new characters. And he will likely be the eldest brother that no one heard of. He'd usually be a bastard child of the father even before the father met the two warring ladies who are now the mothers of two enemy half-brothers. And being the first-born child, he'd most likely have the highest chance at snubbing that throne of being the heir. Now combine this with a twisted plot twist, as we're all rooting for the protagonist that we've come to know (whose legitimacy at being a son is questioned to begin with), either he'd brutally die in the end or it will be proven by DNA testing that he's not a real son of our protagonist's father. Wew! I was almost out of breath just typing that.

Leave a comment

Cat got your tongue?


  • SHARES

More Content